Small Dietary Supplements Manufacturers Battle the Food and Drug Administration Part One
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Small Dietary Supplements Manufacturers Battle the Food and Drug Administration Part One

The Food and Drug Administration has directly damaged small manufacturers of dietary supplements in favor of equally damaging substances of historical significance to the country. The FDA has to take health into consideration. This article series explores this controlling issue and leads the reader to make its own assumptions and further research into the topic of supplement producers versus the FDA.

The Food and Drug Administration has directly damaged small manufacturers of dietary supplements in favor of equally damaging substances of historical significance to the country. The lucrative business and established sin taxes persist while upstart supplemental companies are squashed in the guise of public protection. The similar damage caused by the legal sale and use of alcohol in tobacco is a gross double standard that destroys supplemental start-up industries from growing and competing in the American market. Read on to discover some research about small suppplement producers and their struggles with the FDA.   The writer of the article takes only Vitamin C and leaves you to comment on the issue

The most recent release from the Food and Drug Administration was delivered on July 28th of 2009. The announcement that several warning letters was issued to supplemental producers including American Cellular Laboratories and others forbidding the use of steroids and advertisements pertaining to similar substances. A warning to all consumers was also issued concerning products marketed for body building and increasing muscle mass and anything displayed as or similar to a steroid.

The FDA banned designer drug THG in 2008. According to nutritionist Elizabeth Quinn, tetrahydrogestrinone was banned in part because of the unknown nature of side affects associated with the drug. Structurally related to anabolic steroids, THG is now illegal to market in any form in the United States. This ban has created a black market for getting the substance from underground resources. The under the table doping of professional athletes, bodybuilding, and workout enthusiasts can be likened to the alcohol prohibition and bootlegging that followed.

Supplement providers have been competing for a business that has spiked in popularity over the past three decades. The corporate expansion of gymnasiums including Gold’s and 24 Hour Fitness has expanded memberships and locations throughout the United States. James Summers researches supplements and defines them as a product in a capsule, liquid, or tablet delivering a nutrient (2). Major pharmaceutical companies had largely been in control of vitamin and nutrient production, but few had ventured into the market of workout supporting products past energy bars and drinks.

The fight over control of production continues and seems a viable debate topic.  Who should be able to produce mass quantities is an important issue.  It is health related but also economic. The FDA has to take health into consideration.  This article series explores this controlling issue and leads the reader to make its own assumptions and further research into the topic of supplement producers versus the FDA.

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Comments (3)

This article gives a good observant of FDA.. I like it

Will this article completly enlighten me about the uses of supplement

The FDA has been a long time bone of contention with me. I think the government should stay out of natural food supplements entirely. Years ago (back in early 60's) tylenol was a controlled substance when I was a new nurse. Then it became OTC. Makes me just wonder if the FDA is all about money and has nothing to do with my health, but wants to control substances so they have control.Thank you for this great presentation. Voted up.

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